ER Nurse Salary: What Factors Determine the Amount in 2022?

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    Hello, our dear esteemed reader, Welcome to our informative article about ER Nurse Salary!

    In this article, you’ll learn about the average income for ER Nurses and their career outlook.

    After reading this article, you’ll understand the amount you can earn as an ER Nurse and the factors that will determine your final take-home pay.

    Here is a breakdown of what we’ll talk about:

    How much do ER Nurses make?
    Average ER Nurse Salary by State
    ER Nurse Average Salary by Years of Experience
    Emergency Room Nurse career prospect

    Let’s get started!

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      How Much Do ER Nurses Make?

      According to Payscale, the national average income for Emergency Nurses is $72,397 per year.

      Most ER Registered Nurses earn between $74k and $107k.

      The base salary ranges from $51k to $100k.

      How Much Do ER Nurses Make?

      The average hourly rate is $32.41.

      They also earn a bonus, which is around $7k-$206k.

      Salary.com projects a higher ER Nurses’ average salary.

      The platform estimates an annual income of $108,686, with the majority earning between $91,902 and $125,713.

      On the other hand, Zippia places the average ER Nurse Salary at $75,000.

      The hourly rate is $45.

      According to Zippia, the top earners in this nursing specialty earn $117k.

      In contrast, ZipRecruiter’s median salary for ER Nurses is $78,868.

      The platform projects that the Emergency Nurse Salary ranges from $77k-107k.

      It places ER Nurses’ hourly pay at $45.

      And that’s an overview of the ER Nurse Salary according to different salary projection platforms.

      Let’s now move forward to the average ER Nurse Salary, depending on different factors.

      Average ER Nurse Salary by State

      ER RN salary varies depending on the state the Emergency Nurse works.

      Emergency Nurses in areas with low cost of living tend to earn less than those in cities with a high cost of living.

      According to ZipRecruiter, ER Nurse Salary in California tops the list of top-paying states.

      The top-paying cities include San Francisco, Fremont, San Jose, Nantucket, and Oakland.

      According to the platform, San Francisco is the leading payer in California.

      In San Francisco, ER RN salary is $114,664.

      The second top paying city is also found in California, Fremont.

      Fremont ER Nurse’s average salary is $110,073.

      San Jose is not too far behind.

      ER Nurse pay is around $107,519.

      Emergency Nurses working in Nantucket take home around $107,120.

      Alaska is the fifth top payer, with ER Nurses making $106,343 annually.

      Iowa, Alabama, North Carolina, New Mexico, and Florida top the list of the least paying states.

      ER Nurse Average Salary by Years of Experience

      The salary ER Nurses earn working in the emergency department is tied to their years of experience in the field.

      At the entry level, they can expect to take home $63,183 per year.

      Here, their hourly rate is about $27.44.

      At an early career that is 1-4 years’ experience, they make around $65,737.

      As they advance and gain more hands-on experience in the emergency department, their income increases.

      At the prime of their career, 5-9 years, their annual average income will be $74,564.

      Experienced Emergency Nurses’ salary is $81,455.

      This is when they’ve gained 10-19 years of experience.

      ER Nurses’ hourly pay at this stage is $39.45.

      Lastly, we have Emergency Registered Nurses with 20-plus years of experience.

      These healthcare professionals have seen it all.

      They bring onboard expertise accrued over the years working with a wide range of clients.

      At this stage in their career, ER Nurses’ median salary is $84,421.

      ER Nurse Salary by Speciality 

      Emergency Room Nurses specialize in different areas.

      An ER Nurse may work in pediatrics, emergency or trauma, advanced cardiac life support, intensive care unit (ICU), triage, or post-anesthesia care unit.

      ER Nurse Salary by Speciality

      ER working in post-anesthesia care units earn 6% more, followed by triage ER Nurses making 5% more than others.

      Critical care and advanced life support ER Nurse Salary is 3% more, while Emergency and Pediatric ERs take 1% more than other Nurses.

      Still, on specialty, ER Nurses with advanced education are compensated better.

      For example, a Nurse Practitioner earns more than a staff ER Nurse.

      Certified Emergency Nurse Salary by Industry

      Emergency Nurses working in specialized centers like oncology centers, emergency rooms, or pediatric hospitals earn more than those working in community hospitals.

      Emergency Room Nurse Career Prospect

      The career outlook for ER Nurses is promising.

      There are many Nurse jobs as the demand for Registered Nurses is rising.

      According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there’ll be a 9% increase in the number of job opportunities for RNs between 2020 and 2030.

      More and more healthcare facilities have job openings for ER Nurses to fill staff shortages and relieve overworked full-time Nurses.

      Additionally, there’s an increase in the demand for ER Travel Nurses.

      Employers are going above and beyond to attract and retain Emergency Nurses using irresistible perks and benefits.

      Conclusion

      Emergency Nurses handle patients with injuries, trauma, or severe medical conditions.

      ER Nurse job is demanding, requiring long hours.

      And so, how much an ER Nurse earns will depend on several factors, including their specialty, location, industry, and working hours.

      Despite these factors, the national average income for ER Nurses is $72,397.

      Apart from base salary, they may also get bonuses and overtime payments.

      FAQs

      References 

      Nightingale college

      Payscale.com

      Zippia

      ZipRecruiter

      Salary.com

      Nurse Theory

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